The battery life of most gaming laptops should be ok when you arent gaming. I'm sure most of us understand this. For people who want to play games but also need a laptop for work or school, the batteries should last long enough. I'm assuming most if not all of them are set up so you can run them off the intagrated graphics until you need the dedicated for gaming or whatever.

If you play a lot of games that require complex button presses, then you should consider buying a mouse that reduces the strain. Corsair’s Scimitar Pro is a device that’s geared towards MMO and MOBA players, since it  houses 12 customisable buttons beneath your left thumb – making it incredibly easy to activate weapon combos without taking your hand off your movement keys.
Traditionally gaming laptops have been three things: big, heavy, and expensive. That isn't always the case any longer, as components have gotten smaller and more portable, and increased competition has caused prices to fall quite a bit as well. You still generally get what you pay for in terms of performance and portability, but you can get a great portable 1080p machine these days for less than $1,000 — sometimes way less — which was rarely the case just one generation of hardware ago.
MSI's GT75 Titan is one of the best gaming laptops available. Offering up to a an Intel Core i9-8950HK CPU, an NVIDIA GTX 1080 GPU, and up to 64 GB of RAM, this laptop packs some serious performance. The 17.3-inch display is either a 120 Hz 1920x1080 TN panel, or an optional 3840x2160 60 Hz IPS display. The GT75 Titan features a SteelSeries mechanical keyboard which is a step above most other gaming laptops. The starting price is hefty, but the GT75 Titan is a heavyweight gaming system.
This Chinese manufacturer only has one product line geared towards gamers: the Ideapad Legion Y. This computer is available with either a 15.6″ or 17.3″ display (Legion Y520 and Y720). The Legion Y is in direct competition with the HP Omen and features a variety of different hardware components (entry-level models are equipped with a GeForce GTX 1050 graphics chip). Laptopmag revealed this computer’s negative aspects which mainly concern the quality of its display and the poor performance of its SSD.
Disclosure: Some, not all links, earn us a small affiliate commission. All content remains unbiased despite these relationships.We Have The Best Gaming Laptop Reviews To Rely OnAn increasing number of gamers are choosing gaming laptops over consoles. The best gaming laptop comes with a high-end graphics card such as the gtx 1060 graphics card which can handle high frame rates, full hd and a good refresh rate to guarantee a great gaming experience. Other graphics cards which are capable of rendering high-end games include nvidia geforce gtx 1060, nvidia geforce gtx 1070 and nvidia geforce gtx 1080 among other gaming laptop video cards. High-end processors such as Intel's i5 processors will work for some pc games but you will want to get a computer that has an intel core i7-7700hq or an intel core i7-8750h to be future-proof. 8GB of ram is the minimum requirement for most games but ram 16gb is best for great gaming performance.What Should You Pay for a Gaming Laptop?Good gaming laptops with rendering capabilities as high as consoles are expensive. HP laptops and Lenovo laptops are great for mid-range graphics processing but gaming-specific laptops such as Maingear laptops will give you the best gaming performance. Expect to pay up to $3,500 for a gaming laptop that can play games with rendering capabilities that surpass a console's range. The best laptop models include the msi gs65 stealth thin, the acer predator helios 300 and the asus rog strix. These laptops are able to render games on a screen 15.6-inch fhd 1,920 x 1,080 resolution. The all-new razer blade is a great laptop if you prefer a smaller screen. There are many other best gaming laptop brands that are discussed at Gadget Review.Don't know which one to choose? Go to Gadget Review to get gaming laptop comparison and gaming laptop reviews which will help you make the right decision Our Top CategoriesHome Security  Wireless RoutersOffice Chairs   Standing DesksHome Theater Projectors  Gaming HeadsetsAir Conditioners   Microwaves    ElectronicsSatellite TV   Televisions    Gadgets    GiftsTop Best of ListsBest Home Security      Best Wireless RoutersBest Office Chairs       Best Standing DesksBest Home Theater Projector   Best Xbox One HeadsetDish vs DirecTV Comparison    Best HoverboardsBest Microwave   Best Smart Air ConditionerBest Projector Under $1000About Gadget ReviewGadget Review, founded in 2005, believes in true and honest reviews that will help any consumer, savvy or not, make the right purchase. Our team of experts work around the clock researching 100s of products and services every month to ensure that you buy not just the correct product, but the best product,Who We AreAbout Us   How We Rate ProductsOur Honesty Pledge   Contact UsPrivacy Policy   Accessibility   Terms of UseAdvertiser DisclosureGadget Review works with a variety of advertisers to help monetize the site’s traffic. This is what allows us to offer our content free of charge or without a paywall. Because of this, some of the links on this page may earn us a commission when you click thru and purchase from the associated site. However, at no time, and will it never affect our rankings or judgment of the product(s) in discussion or under evaluation. In short, we’ll always remain objective and find you the best products regardless of any monetary incentive. You can read more about our honest pledge for additional insight on this matter.Gadget Review © 2018 | All Rights Reserved | Your lifestyle gadget site. /* */ /* */ /* */ /* */ /* */ /* ]]> */ window._taboola = window._taboola || [];
Processors are the next biggest difference. You'll likely get a capable Core i5 instead of a faster Core i7. Still, some of the benefits of an i7 machine aren't a major factor for gaming, but instead benefit video editing and other creative uses, so an i5 will do the job. The newest generation of these chips are fast and efficient at a base level, and won't be too much of a bottleneck for gaming. On the AMD side of the fence, in the rare gaming laptops you'll find based wholly on AMD core technology, gamers will see mostly graphics solutions based on the now-aging Radeon RX 560, RX 570, and RX 580 paired with one of several AMD FX or Ryzen CPUs. Outside of the graphics card and processor, the other components should actually be closer to more expensive machines than you'd expect.
Resolution: Never get anything less than a 1920 x 1080 display. It’s rare to find one with a lesser resolution, but if you do, run. If you have a GTX 1070 or GTX 1080, you may want to consider a 2560 x 1440 display. 4K (3840 x 2160) screens are an option on some gaming laptop, but it’s rare you’ll be able to both get enough graphical fidelity at that resolution while also maintaining a smooth frame rate.

Under $1,000: While you might see a few notebooks with Intel Core i5 processors at this price range, there are plenty with 7th-generation Intel Core i7 CPUs and at least 8GB of RAM. Display-wise you can expect a 1080p display with average color reproduction, accuracy and brightness. Now that SSDs are becoming more commonplace, you can get a solid SSD at below $1,000. However, it's unlikely that it'll be a slower configuration instead of a high-speed PCIe device. Your rig will probably be outfitted with 1TB HDD (usually 5,400-rpm) and a Nvidia GeForce 1050 or 1050 Ti GPU with between 2-4 GB of VRAM. A laptop with these specs can play most titles at a solid frame rate at medium settings, but you can expect some trouble at higher configurations. (See our favorite sub-$1,000 gaming laptops here.)

With the ability to game on the go, gaming laptops provide the most harmonious combination of hardware designed to work together to achieve optimal gaming performance. With so much choice, finding the best gaming laptop for you can be a daunting task. However, the best place to start is to decide on your budget and check the recommended specs required by the games you want to play.

HP launched this updated Pavilion line in April to make a play for those who are maybe interested in gaming, but not willing to go all-in on a laptop from the PC maker's Omen brand. We haven't seen it in person yet, but HP's direct pricing is on par with the competition here. The entry-level configuration is skippable at $680, but you can configure it for $750 with a Core i5-8300H processor and a GeForce GTX 1050Ti or a six-core Intel Core i7-8750H processor and a 3GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 for $920. 


The Alienware 17 R5 is available in a variety of configurations, from a $1,560 model with a 6-core Core i7-8750H, an overclocked GeForce GTX 1060, and a 60Hz 1080p display, all the way up to the price-is-no-object-I-want-performance version we tested ($3,810 from Dell). Optional features could push that total even higher, but there’s already plenty to love. This is 10 pounds of gaming-laptop-slash-desktop-replacement-extraordinaire. Read our review.
High-end systems, meanwhile, should guarantee you smooth gameplay at 1080p with graphics details maxed out, and might let you play at 4K resolution (if the screen supports it). A high-end model should also be able to power a VR headset and support additional external monitors. These machines tend to come with speedy storage components such as 512GB PCI Express solid-state drives, and they are priced above $2,500. Some support 3K to 4K screens, a hard drive to supplement the SSD, and ultra-efficient cooling fans as optional extras. A few elite boutique models will support dual graphics chips. (Such rare-bird machines will be massive and expensive, with minimal battery life.)
The Acer Nitro 5 Spin delivers solid multitasking power, good battery life, a comfortable keyboard and oodles of versatility thanks to its easily convertible design. A Nvidia GTX 1050 GPU means that you can play most games at low or medium settings. It's a solid choice for games looking for an affordable gaming system that does more than play games.
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