Let me say, this is an incredible post, thank you very much for this, I have bookmarked this post for future reference. I have a question, I am considering getting the new Asus gl702vm-ds74, which is the bigger screen (17.3 inch) compared to the gl502vm-ds74(15.6 inch ). Is the smaller 15.6 inch screen going to run better than the 17.3 inch screen because it requires less power to power the screen? I really appreciate your feedback, Thank you!
The G7’s 60 Hz 1920×1080 IPS display was neither the best we tested nor the worst. It made games look good, and the G7’s display looked noticeably better than the G5’s and G3’s screens, which both had a sickly greenish tint. We found that the G7’s screen couldn’t get as bright as those of the other budget gaming laptops we tested, maxing out at 228 nits compared with the Lenovo Y530’s 266 nits and the Asus TUF Gaming FX504GM’s above-average 317 nits. And although it’s not a requirement, we’d love to see a higher-refresh-rate panel available on the Dell G7, since that would make first-person games smoother and more enjoyable.

Matthew Buzzi is a Hardware Analyst at PCMag, focusing on laptops and desktops with a specialty in gaming systems and games. Matthew earned a degree in Mass Communications/Journalism and interned for a college semester at Kotaku, writing about gaming before turning it into part of his career. He spends entirely too much time on Twitter (find him @M... See Full Bio
If you want our top recommendation, it's the Razer Mamba Tournament Edition (available at Amazon). This mouse strikes a perfect value stance between price and pedigree, delivering professional polish for a very attractive price. We tested a dozen of the top-selling and top-rated mice from leading gaming brands, and while the Mamba Tournament Edition doesn't deliver the most buttons nor the widest feature set, it's the sturdiest, sleekest, and best-feeling pick in the bunch.
Storage: Hard drive or SSD? Why not both? Some budget gaming laptops will come with only a hard drive (usually 1TB), but the majority of gaming notebooks also include a small SSD to serve as a boot drive. It’s not uncommon to see a 128GB SSD and 1TB HDD working in tandem. If you can get a larger SSD you may see decreased loading times, but that will also cost you quite a bit more money. Make sure you get a faster, 7,200-rpm HDD as opposed to a 5,400-rpm HDD.
Razer isn’t exaggerating when it calls its Blade 15 (available on Amazon) the “world’s smallest  15-inch gaming laptop.” While it’s impressive to get a six-core 8th gen Core i7-8750H and GeForce GTX 1070 Max-Q performance into a compact chassis, note that it’s densely packed and feels heavy for its size. If you can deal with the additional weight, the payoff may well be worth it. Read our review. 
On the AMD side of the fence, the on-chip graphics solutions in the company's A8-, A10-, and A12-series processors are pretty good (as integrated graphics go). As a result, you'll see almost no AMD-based laptops under $1,000 with dedicated graphics. That's because the presence of an AMD CPU, in the first place, is usually a low-price play by the laptop maker. Adding a GPU would just bump up the price.
The subtle graphics of the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB is being based on the latest Pascal-architecture, providing desktop performances to a laptop.  Testing the FPS (Frames per Second) on titles such as Hitman (49 FPS); Rise of the Tomb Raider (48 FPS); Shadow of Mordor (87 FPS) and, Grand Theft Auto V (59.2 FPS), have shown no difficulties in achieving well enough FPS. Even though the FX502VM is not placed on the market with Gsync support, it does not use Optimus.
What’s more, some GeForce GTX 1060, 1070 and 1080 chips are labeled as “Max-Q”, meaning that they operate at a slightly lower frequency than “normal” graphics chips in order to reduce heat and facilitate their integration into thin and lightweight computers (which are not equipped with the same type of substantial cooling system as larger laptops). As a result, the performance of these chips is slightly lower (around 10% lower) than their non-Max-Q counterparts.
Best ListsBest GadgetsBest Wireless RoutersBest DSLR CamerasBest 4k TVsBest 65 Inch TVsBest 70 Inch TVsBest Home ProjectorsBest Home SecurityBest HoverboardsBest Office ChairsBest Standing DesksBest Xbox One HeadsetsDIRECTV vs. DISHBest Air ConditionersBest MicrowavesTVsProjectorsDLP ProjectorsLCD ProjectorsLED ProjectorsPortable ProjectorsUltra HD 4K TVsLCD TVsLED TVsOLED TVsSmart TVsSatellite TVAudioHeadphonesBluetooth HeadphonesNoise Cancelling HeadphonesOver the Ear HeadphonesHome AudioHome Theater SpeakersHome Theater SystemsSpeakersBluetooth SpeakersComputer SpeakersPortable SpeakersWireless SpeakersCamerasDSLR CamerasPoint and Shoot Cameras3D CamerasVideo CamerasVlogging CamerasWaterproof CamerasHome Security CamerasSmart Home Security CamerasComputersDesktop ComputersComputer AccessoriesWireless RoutersPrintersComputer MonitorsLaptop ComputersChromebooksUltrabooksLaptops for CollegeAppliancesKitchenCoffee MakersBlendersMicrowavesRefrigeratorsToaster OvensToastersHome & OfficeStanding DesksOffice ChairsSmart Home AutomationHome Security SystemsHome Security CamerasMattress ReviewsVacuum CleanersAir PurifiersWashing MachinesGamingVideo Game ConsolesVideo GamesGaming LaptopsGaming PCsGaming AccessoriesGaming KeyboardsGaming MonitorsGaming ChairsGaming HeadsetsOutdoorCamping GearHiking GearSkiingLawnmowersGrillsHoverboardsKayaksRadar DetectorsElectronic CigarettesBest ListsBest GadgetsBest Wireless RoutersBest DSLR CamerasBest 4k TVsBest 65 Inch TVsBest 70 Inch TVsBest Home ProjectorsBest Home SecurityBest HoverboardsBest Office ChairsBest Standing DesksBest Xbox One HeadsetsDIRECTV vs. DISHBest Air ConditionersBest MicrowavesTVsProjectorsDLP ProjectorsLCD ProjectorsLED ProjectorsPortable ProjectorsUltra HD 4K TVsLCD TVsLED TVsOLED TVsSmart TVsSatellite TVAudioHeadphonesBluetooth HeadphonesNoise Cancelling HeadphonesOver the Ear HeadphonesHome AudioHome Theater SpeakersHome Theater SystemsSpeakersBluetooth SpeakersComputer SpeakersPortable SpeakersWireless SpeakersCamerasDSLR CamerasPoint and Shoot Cameras3D CamerasVideo CamerasVlogging CamerasWaterproof CamerasHome Security CamerasSmart Home Security CamerasComputersDesktop ComputersComputer AccessoriesWireless RoutersPrintersComputer MonitorsLaptop ComputersChromebooksUltrabooksLaptops for CollegeAppliancesKitchenCoffee MakersBlendersMicrowavesRefrigeratorsToaster OvensToastersHome & OfficeStanding DesksOffice ChairsSmart Home AutomationHome Security SystemsHome Security CamerasMattress ReviewsVacuum CleanersAir PurifiersWashing MachinesGamingVideo Game ConsolesVideo GamesGaming LaptopsGaming PCsGaming AccessoriesGaming KeyboardsGaming MonitorsGaming ChairsGaming HeadsetsOutdoorCamping GearHiking GearSkiingLawnmowersGrillsHoverboardsKayaksRadar DetectorsElectronic CigarettesSearch on Gadget Review Home ▸ Reviews ▸ Electronic Reviews ▸ Computers ▸ Laptop Computers ▸ Gaming Laptop Reviews ▸ Best Gaming Laptop Gaming LaptopsBest Gaming Laptop – The Beginner’s Guide to Portable Gaming Chris Stobing Updated December 28, 2017 We've picked the best laptops for gaming money can buy.Share11Pin2Tweet+1Share13 SharesAre you in the market to find the best gaming laptop in 2018, but aren’t sure where to start looking? “It should just be like any gaming peripheral”, you might be saying to yourself, “bigger and badder is better, right?”.  Not entirely, as we learned in our best gaming PC list last week.As you’ll find out in this review roundup, picking the top gaming laptop off the proverbial shelf isn’t always a simple matter of just pitting the best specs against the rest.
MSI have had a 'warranty void if removed' sticker under their machines for years. Check before you buy as it can make upgrading painful. Forget about spindle drives, get a smaller SSD and just use an external drive if you have to. Loading a spindle drive just chews power, slows everything down, and makes noise and heat. They are the suck. Higher res screens require more powerful GFX cards due to the higher resolution. Think carefully about the 4k screen if you're only getting a low end GPU. Get a low latency wireless network card that supports the highest wireless range you can get. There's no point limiting your new machine to last years bandwidth. Think about a game controller to save your keyboard from being mashed. Replacing a laptop keyboard = expensive. Buy a decent mouse as well, SteelSeries and Razor make some great units. Lastly, think about the life cycle of your laptop : they do not last forever so work out when you'll likely want/need to sell it and buy a new one. You want to do that while it's still worth something. You also don't want to be stuck with a high end laptop thats out of warranty which developes a problem. Selling it while it's still valuable means your new machine costs less.
The Intel HD Graphics 620 GPU is more suited to classic games and will run popular older titles such as World of Warcraft and Diablo III. Powering the Acer Aspire E E5-575-53EJ is a seventh generation Dual-Core Intel Core i5-7200U processor and 8GB of DDR4 memory. This will easily cope with everyday tasks and will even allow you to use more intensive applications such as Adobe Photoshop or CorelDRAW. You can upgrade the RAM to 16GB as the Acer Aspire E E5-575-53EJ features an empty slot, however, this is not necessary for most users.
The choice of CPU is also important. All the laptops on this list come equipped with quad-core Intel Core i5 or i7 processors with ‘HQ’ or ‘HK’ at the end of their model names, but you’ll find some cheaper models on the market that only have a ‘U’ suffix. This denotes a much lower-power, dual-core processor that can prove to be a huge bottleneck in games if you have a high-end graphics card.
The 256GB M.2 SSD is slightly small, and it is bound to fill up soon if you have large game library, but it is blazing fast, meaning your load and boot up times will be quick. The battery life is disappointing, however, running out of juice after about 3 hours of heavy use. You will need to remain plugged in most of the time, but this shouldn’t come at much of a surprise considering its energy-sapping components.

Gaming laptops need to have the necessary processing power to run high-end games. Laptops with good processing speed help run your games seamlessly without any lag. When it comes to a CPU, the important elements to be considered are the number of cores it contains and its processing speed. A laptop with a powerful CPU ensures a lag-free gaming experience.
As we noted earlier, 15.6 inches is the general size rule for most under-$1,000 gaming laptops. This size is a good compromise in ways that extend beyond cost. Sometimes, gaming on the biggest laptop screen possible—and with a few exotic exceptions, that's the 17-inch class—is the way to go. But if you've ever tried carrying one of these machines, or shopped for a laptop bag that can fit both it and its gigantic power adapter, you may have second thoughts. Most of these notebooks weigh eight pounds or more.
Planning on spending hours upon hours handing out beatdowns in Fortnite or Call of Duty? Check out the Dell G3 15 Gaming laptop, which lasted an impressive 6 hours and 37 minutes on our battery test. Gamers also get a system capable of kicking out some solid frame rates and good sound, thanks to a GTX 1050 Ti GPU and some powerful speakers. And at 5.2 pounds and 0.9 inches thick, this is one of the thinnest entry-level gaming laptops available.
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